When Coronavirus meets e-commerce, kind of...

How we “randomly” came across a golden egg via a SEO search based on a sample of Woo Commerce sites.

One of our favourite sources to seed a research and venture into the SEO rabbit hole is StoreLeads. You can use it in many ways. One of them is to type a search term into the sidebar. We were curious to see what would come up using “Coronavirus”. Interestingly there were 1,500+ results available across WooCommerce and Shopify. Let’s dive in.

Coronavirus Shopift Woo Commerce

Corona, CA

We ranked the results by ascending Alexa order (from the most visited to the least visited site) and exported the CSV list. Then we picked the first 200 results and pasted them into ahrefs (there’s a limit at 200 per query in the Batch Tool). And we ranked the results by Traffic (descending order). Here comes the first surprise, a “false positive”, fresno.gov. 

It doesn’t belong to the list due to its outstanding coverage of the Coronavirus theme but because Fresno, a city located a city in California’s San Joaquin Valley, seems to be somehow related to another Californian city at a 4H19′ drive from Fresno, Corona. 

Coronavirus Shopify Woocommerce ahrefs analysis
Fresno To Corona
Fresno to Corona, CA

We’re not done with SEO surprises. If the queries generating traffic on Fresno.gov are Corona city-related, they’re not addressing the disease but the wildfires which struck Corona, while leading to the page on Fresno’s website dedicated to the infamous virus. Interesting, isn’t it? 

fire in corona California

This /coronavirus page also attracts traffic for a bunch of other queries, among which “is it illegal to make a virus”. 

coronavirus fresno

Corona, cheers!

Fresno.gov was a false positive at the top of our list. What about the next result, Centralmarket.com, a WooCommerce site? 

Bingo! Exactly what I was expecting… Not the Chinese virus but the Mexican beer, in bottle and in cans.  

 

Coronavirus Beer

Speaking of which, I’ve always wondered whether the Corona website “benefited” from the crisis. Let’s find out, courtesy of semrush (ahrefs was in maintenance mode when I want to run a quick check). 

Corona.com impact of Coronavirus

As you can see, the traffic spiked in January 2020, in the early days of the pandemic and again in March 2021 (second wave). The main keywords driving traffic to the site aren’t virus-related but the head term Corona, which can be used in both cases, appears in second position, just after the more obvious “corona beer”. So we can clearly assume that Corona Extra got some (irrelevant) traffic at the peak of the pandemic. No KW incl. “virus” is to be found in the queries generating traffic for the iconic mexican beer. 

Furry Corona

Before even checking the keywords list, I opened the next site on the leaderboard, CFA.org, not to confuse with CIA.gov). I love cats but I wasn’t aware of the existence of the very official Cat Fanciers’ Association, celebrating our furry friends since 1906. Why do they appear in this list? 

Cat Fanciers Association

Well, in their case, simply because they published a page detailing the effects of COVID-19 not on the cats but on their organization, in terms of opening hours, remote work policy, etc. They also have a special page dedicated to the requirements for the well-being of clubs and participants at CFA events in the context of the pandemic. Nothing about the transmission of the virus between cats and humans. More about that on CDC.gov

Cosmocorona

Let’s move on to the next site on the list, Cosmosmagazine.com, an Australian WordPress blog using WooCommerce in its shop section (not per se an e-commerce site). 

Why do they appear in this leaderboard? Let’s type in “Corona” in their keywords list. 

This time, finally, we’re on the expected topic. Cosmosmagazine dedicated a few articles to Covid-19, among which “What’s so scary about the UK variant?”.

Corona in Chile

A few moments ago we were in Mexico reviewing the impact of the pandemic on their iconic beer’s website traffic. Let’s head south to Chile for the last site we’ll cover in this article, ecofarmacias, the first actual e-commerce site in our Top 5. That’s what happens when you include WooCommerce in a report, many WordPress sites using Woo as their cart solution for a shopping section or other forms of transactions.

This online pharmacy has naturally generated traffic from Coronavirus-related queries, not directly (we don’t have any terms including “Corona” or “Covid”) but for products like this box of Azibiotic 500 mg, a brand of azithromycin, used in some treatments against Covid-19.

Final note: had we restricted our original search to Shopify, we would probably have had less “false positives”, due to the presence of editorial WordPress sites (the first 2 Shopify sites are coronatestcentre.com and dbprotective.com, 100% on topic). But it was nevertheless another very informative journey in the alleys of the web, full of surprises. 

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